Follow by Email

Friday, May 9, 2014

New Book to Indentify Common Grasses

Readers of the new book, “Field Guide to the Common Grasses of Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska” by KNPS board member, Iralee Barnard, will expand their knowledge and identification skills to the beautiful array of this important adaptive grass family.

Iralee adds a blend of ecological and cultural contextual information with her identification steps so the novice and expert alike will not only be able to recognize and identify the grasses so abundant in our natural landscape but to do so with an interesting diversity of complimentary information about each grass species.

Only two of every ten species of the heartland’s 3,000 species of wild plants are grasses yet these grasses can account for 90% of the ground cover.  Seventy of the most common grass species are included with 415 color photographs revealing details not found in previous grass identification field guides.

Iralee’s artistic ability coupled with her extensive botanist background has influenced this unique field guide format.  Clear descriptions, a “finding list” system using flowering heads, leaf details with size comparisons and whole mature plant color pictures help the reader systematically walk through the identification process.

An Illustrated glossary, leaf comparison sections and table of grass flowering dates provide additional information for recognizing and identification. Descriptions focus on the primary characteristics of each species and are accompanied by distribution maps.

Iralee exemplifies KNPS members by her book dedication remarks,
This book is dedicated to all who love the outdoors and learning. May your path be interesting and filled with pleasure in all seasons.



Treat yourself to a field companion you will not want to be without. Now available in local and online book suppliers. ISBN 978-0-7006-1945-0 University Press of Kansas, 2014.

Photo Album of Western Kansas Field Trips

On May 3-4, KNPS members enjoyed three field trips in the far western part of the state.  At least 37 flowering species were seen at the Smoky Valley Ranch, Lake Scott, and Monument Rocks. There were so many unique plants that are adapted to the arid conditions of western Kansas. Be sure to check out KNPS's Garden City Regional Leader, Anthony Zukoff, photo album: Spring Board Meeting Field Trips.  Each image in the album has an informative caption associated with it.

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

New Titles Added to Recommended Books List

We have added more titles to our list of Recommended Books. All new listings are indicated. Find nature related subjects such as field guides, prairie, and wildlife.